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Chef’s Feed

Produce Market Report May 3, 2019

By | Chef's Feed

May 3, 2019:

 

Tomatoes: Steady.  Good quality

 

Potatoes: Steady

Red potatoes: Going up with fresh crop Florida starting.  Good quality

 

Lettuces: Steady 

 

Cauliflower: Up $20!!

 

Broccoli: Up $6

 

Grapes: Steady

 

Strawberries: Stabilizing.  Better quality expected

 

Melons: Cantaloupes up $5, Honeydews steady 

 

Lemons: Smaller sizes up $4-5

 

Squash: up $2-3.  Zucchini steady

 

Peppers: Green up $5

 

Onions: Remain higher but stabilizing 

 

Celery: Remains very high

 

Apples: Steady

 

Cucumbers: Steady

 

Limes: Steady

 

Avocados: Remain high

 

Brussels Sprouts: Short supplies, Expect high prices 

 

Weekend Seafood News

By | Chef's Feed, Seafood

Fresh seafood options for the weekend!

 

American Red Snapper

New Orleans, LA

Item 71271 – Whole 8-12 lb avg

Item 03386 – Fillet

Line caught from Port of Chauvin from the boat, Sailfish.

 

 

 

 

Yellowtail

Sea of Cortez

Item 71105 – Whole 12 lb avg

Item 03338 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

 

Barracuda

Ponce Inlet, Florida

Item 03547 – 8-18 lb avg

 

 

 

 

Pacific Halibut

Oregon Coast

Item 04584 – Whole 10-20 lb avg

Sustainably fished, MSC certified waters.

 

 

 

 

 

St. John’s River Catfish Fillet

St. John’s River, Florida

Item 71128

 

 

 

 

 

Pink Baja Grouper

Baja, California

Item 03810

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink Porgy Snapper

Chauvin, Louisiana

Item 71198

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New frozen items available from Organic Oceans:

Organic Ocean supplies sustainable seafood that is not just better for the planet, but tastes better too. Their traditional harvesting and delicate handling techniques produces seafood that connoisseurs consider to be among the best in the world.

 

Spot Prawn Tails 25-30 ct

Vancouver, BC

Item 04243

Premium quality, frozen in sea water.  These are caught off English Bay, Vancouver BC from Organic Ocean’s spot prawn boat captained by Dane Chauvel.  Sustainably rated – Best Choice!

 

 

 

 

Sidestripe Shrimp 35-40 ct.

Chatham Sound

Item 04241

Hand picked by the crew at Organic Ocean from the Pacific Ranger and sustainably caught off the Chatham sound, these sashimi quality shrimp are PREMIUM. Incredibly sweet as shrimp go.  Packed in seawater, these are amazing! Tails, shell on frozen.

 

 

 

 

Humpback Shrimp Tails 25-30 ct.

Vancouver, BC

Item 04242

Wild, sustainably caught Humpback shrimp are a local legend in Prince Rupert. Extremely exclusive artisinal fishery – one of a few in the world. These premium shrimp tails caught on small boats and packed in sea water and are wonderful. Lightly sweet and earthy when raw, their sweetness is pronounced when cooked. Certainly the best of the three Vancouver Island shrimp when cooked.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week’s fresh seafood list and prices:

 

WHAT CHEFS WANT – FRESH SEAFOOD LIST

 

You can now call and TEXT our Seafood hotline at 502-587-1505.

Have a question?  Get answers quickly from our seafood specialists.

 

 

 

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Cinco de Mayo Items

By | Chef's Feed, Holiday, What Chefs Want

 Mexican Chorizo – Item 00511 10 lb case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Queso Cotija – Item 91159

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Kabob Mini Taco Shells – Item 90655 – 150 count

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Queso Fresco – Item 96549

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Pinto Beans – Item 14195 – 50 lb case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Jarritos Pineapple – Item 99211 – 24/12.5 oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Natalie’s Margarita Mix – Item 125723 – 6/64 oz case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 6″ Tortilla – White Corn Locally made in Louisville / Item 90481 – 600 count case

 

 

 

 

 

  Veggie Fajita Mix – Item 17262 – 5 lb case

 

 

 

 

 

Select the Cinco de Mayo button on the What Chefs Want website to see more specials!

 

Panel Urges Tomato Industry To Be Prepared For Disruptions

By | Chef's Feed, Produce, What Chefs Want

Panel urges tomato industry to be prepared for disruptions.

SAN ANTONIO, Texas – Painful changes are coming soon in how Mexican tomatoes are sold to U.S. importers.

A panel of industry leaders at Texas International Produce Association’s Viva Fresh show said the industry should brace for potential disruptions and consolidation in the wake of those changes.

A packed session April 26 the 2019 Viva Fresh show looked at the implications of the end of the tomato suspension agreement and between Mexican tomato growers and the U.S. Department of Commerce — and the likely start of anti-dumping duties.

The session was moderated by Dante Galeazzi, president and CEO of the Texas International Produce Association. Galeazzi said the tomato suspension agreement has been around since 1996, and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Feb. 7 announcement of their intent to withdraw from the current agreement on May 7 has dramatically changed the supply scenario for tomatoes in the North American marketplace.

The session included discussions of the history of agreement, the current status of the negotiations and how the end of the suspension could impact the future of the tomato supply chain.

Panelist Lance Jungmeyer, president of the Fresh Produce Association of the Americas, said the original suspension agreement was renegotiated at the end of 2002, in 2008 and again in 2013.

Jungmeyer said there has never been a finding of dumping or major violations of the agreement.

“There are enforcement mechanisms in place, and so it’s unfortunate that a political process has entered into this,” he said, noting a February letter from Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and other lawmakers from the U.S. Southeast that asked the Department of Commerce to immediately terminate the suspension agreement. While Commerce did not agree to immediately end the agreement, it did signal its intent to terminate the agreement May 7.

When that happens, Jungmeyer said the Department of Commerce is expected to slap a 17.56% tariff on imports of Mexican tomatoes and resume its long-suspended dumping investigation. The timing to terminate the agreement is set only days before the International Trade Commission was scheduled to make a determination whether the suspension agreement was still needed, or if the tomato trade could return to a free market.

Countering Southeast U.S. lawmakers who want to end the suspension agreement, Jungmeyer said the Border Trade Alliance has attracted the support of lawmakers from border states who are striving to keep it in place.

“These (members of Congress) know and understand the dynamics and how important these industries are to their community,” he said.

The Florida Tomato Exchange in November 2017 has advocated for “crazy” changes in the suspension agreement that would limit inspection adjustments, Jungmeyer said, among other changes.

Under the proposal, if a load does have a problem, the entire load must be returned to Mexico at the shipper’s expense.

Another requested change is that the minimum reference price would be applied to all non-retail purchases within U.S. through the last sale. That would limit the ability of wholesalers to move tomatoes at a reduced price if there are condition factors in the load. “That tomato seller can’t sell for a loss even if they need to,” Jungmeyer said.

Mexican growers have proposed changes in the suspension agreement negotiations that would increase the minimum reference price, provide new enforcement measures and tweak inspection adjustment rules.

Even with the more generous proposal, Commerce still has not responded.

“We’re hopeful there will be a new suspension agreement, (but) we are preparing people to pay duties,” Jungmeyer said.

Jungmeyer said small and medium size companies will suffer if the suspension agreement lapses and likely will be forced to close or consolidate.

Session panelist Jason Klinowski, agriculture and food law attorney at Wallace Jordan Ratliff & Brandt LLC in Birmingham, Ala., said changes to the processes of importing Mexican tomatoes will be significant but not “insurmountable.”

Compliance with the new rules will be challenging, he said, as contracts with suppliers and customers must be examined.

“The million dollar question really is ‘What does compliance look like for you?’ ” he said.

If the agreement lapses, the minimum reference price will be gone. However, there will be a risk of audit for enforcement of the duty and the question of who will be “holding the bag” if anti-dumping duties are not paid.

“In the absence of a reference price, you can’t rely on the fact that your growers are selling to you at a profit and you are also selling at a profit in the United States to avoid a finding of dumping,” he said.

Commerce can conduct audits and come up with a “construed” export price which could disregard the cheaper labor costs in Mexico and find dumping based on U.S. labor costs.

“I absolutely agree that there’s going to be some consolidation and moves in the small to mid-cap section on both the U.S. and the Mexican side,” he said.

Importers will have to have a $50,000 bonding requirement to ensure an anti-dumping duty is paid.

“In an anti-dumping situation, a $50,000 bond would give roughly $2.8 million of entered value before you’re going to get a notice of bond insufficiency from customs — and that point of time, pay up or stop,” Klinowski said.

He also warned that suppliers should avoid being involved in pricing contracts with retailers that don’t account for the added expense of the tariff.

Even if there is an 11th-hour agreement and a new suspension agreement, he said , the anti-dumping duty would likely be in place for at least 30 days while the agreement is put out for public comment.

Session panelist J.O. Alvarez, Jr., president of J.O. Alvarez Inc., Laredo, Texas, said importers must start getting ready to put in place a minimum $50,000 bond to account for the duty.

Last year, Mexico exported just about $2 billion worth of tomato products to the U.S.,” he said. “That’s a whole lot — and then add to that a 17.56% duty.”

Alvarez urged importers to be prepared. “Let’s just hope it doesn’t happen,” he said.

After the panel discussion, a press briefing was held to review findings of an analysis by economists at Arizona State University that said consumer prices for tomatoes could rise up to 40% in the period of May to December if the U.S. Department of Commerce withdraws from the tomato suspension agreement. During the winter, the report said prices of certain varieties of tomatoes could jump more than 85%, according to the study.

 Article by Tom Karst from The Packer 4/27/19

Produce Market Report – April 26, 2019

By | Chef's Feed, Produce, Produce Market Report

Tomatoes: Steady.  Good quality

 

Potatoes: Steady

Red potatoes: Steady

 

Lettuces: Down Slightly

 

Cauliflower: Up $5

 

Broccoli: Up $4

 

Grapes: Steady

 

Strawberries: Down.  Quality improving.

 

Melons: Cantaloupes up $3

 

Lemons: Up $5

 

Squash: up $2-3

 

Peppers: Steady

 

Onions: Remain higher but stabilizing.

 

Celery: Remains very high.  Super tight supplies!  Historic high prices.

 

Apples: Steady

 

Cucumbers: Steady

 

Limes: Up $5

 

Avocados: Remain high, but coming down slightly.

 

 

 

 

Weekend Seafood News

By | Chef's Feed, Seafood

Fresh seafood options for the weekend!

 

American Red Snapper

New Orleans, LA

Item 71271 – Whole 8-12 lb avg

Item 03386 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

Yellowtail

Sea of Cortez

Item 71105 – Whole 12 lb avg

Item 03338 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

 

Gray Blueline Tile

Ponce Inlet, Florida

Item 03547 – 6-8 lb avg

 

 

 

 

Pacific Halibut

Oregon Coast

Item 04584 – Whole 10-20 lb avg

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. John’s River Catfish Fillet

St. John’s River, Florida

Item 71128

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week’s fresh seafood list and prices:

WHATCHEFSWANT FRESH SEAFOOD LIST 42519

 

 

New!  You can now call and TEXT our Seafood hotline at 502-587-1505.

Have a question?  Get answers quickly from our seafood specialists.

 

 

 

Follow us to be a What Chefs Want Insider!

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Two Brooks Rice

By | Chef's Feed, Southern Foods, Uncategorized

Mike Wagner began his dream of owning a rice farm 35 years ago during a college class. Over time, as a 10th generation American farmer, he bought his own plot of land in the Mississippi Delta, graded and cared for it so that he could grow health-conscious varieties of rice in a way that not only benefits the consumer but the environment.

If you’re interested in how your food and farming practices impacts you – and the world around you – then you’ll enjoy this episode with Mike Wagner. Plus, he talks about the difference between building and sustaining and offers a unique perspective on food production that we can’t wait for you to hear!

Tasting dirt with Mike Wagner

 

 Two Brooks Missimati Rice – Item 96614 – 2 lb bag

 

 

Meat Specials for Derby and Mother’s Day

By | Chef's Feed, Meats, What Chefs Want

55361-2/5# Black Hawk Ground Fresh-$37.50 CASE

 

 

99963-20/8oz Black Hawk Baseball Cut Sirloins-$13.25 LB

 

 

 

 

 

05591-Grass Fed Trimmed Beef Tenderloin Each-$17.95 LB Antibiotic and Hormone Free

 

 

 

00417-10/2ct 1.5″ Border Springs Lamb Loin Chops-$19.95 LB

 

 

 

05572-10/16oz Choice Bone In Strips-$14.95 LB

 

 

 

 

30105-4/5lb 6-8oz Koch Airline Chicken Breast(Frozen)-$4.95 LB

 

 

 

00201-40 Day Dry Aged Prime Bone In Striploin-$14.40 LB

 

32616-Custom Cut to Chef’s Specifications-$16.40 LB

 

 

05495-40 Day Dry Aged Prime Bone In Export Ribeyes-$17.50 LB

 

 

 

 

 

32615-Custom Cut to Chef’s Specifications-$18.50 LB

 

 

06416-Whole Frenched Berkshire Pork Rack 7lb Avg.-$9.95lb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow us to be a What Chefs Want Insider!

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Weekend Seafood News

By | Chef's Feed, Seafood

Fresh seafood options for the weekend!

 

American Red Snapper

New Orleans, LA

Item 71271 – Whole 8-12 lb avg

Item 03386 – Fillet

 

 

Yellowedge Grouper

Ponce Inlet, Florida

Item 71154 – Whole 25-30 lb avg

Item 03379 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

Pompano

Cape Canaveral, FL

Item 71195 – Whole – 1-2  lb avg

Item 03444 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

Yellowtail

Sea of Cortez

Item 71105 – Whole 12 lb avg

Item 03338 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

Cobia

Ponce Inlet, FL

Item 71131 – Whole 12-20 lb avg

Item 03414 – Fillet

 

 

 

 

 

Gray Blueline Tile

Ponce Inlet, Florida

Item 03547 – 6-8 lb avg

 

 

 

 

Pacific Halibut

Oregon Coast

Item 04584 – Whole 10-20 lb avg

 

 

 

 

 

New!  You can now call and TEXT our Seafood hotline at 502-587-1505.

Have a question?  Get answers quickly from our seafood specialists.

 

 

WHATCHEFSWANT FRESH SEAFOOD LIST 4 15 19

 

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